Naptime Reads


This week we decided to reformat our weekly roundup to make it more readable for you! We hope you enjoy the new layout almost as much as we hope you enjoy the weekend!

Our favorite articles:

  • How Gardening helps build happier and healthier kids
  • How being busy kills creativity, and what we can do to build creativity (for us and for children)
  • How to use giggles to encourage cooperation in toddlers!
  • This article on why to sing all day validates why I make up songs to sing to/with kids every day! (Mackenzie)
  • Being a Nanny Does Not ruin being a Mom (and I would say it again and louder for the critics in the back commenting on how Nannying must be the best birth control).

 

“Many of the world’s greatest minds made important discoveries while not doing much at all.” Derek Beres

 

Our favorite video:

We can’t help but giggle at this Despatcio parody by sesame street!

 

Our children’s book of the week:

King Baby by Kate Beaton

Spotlight Sunday: Krista

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Tell us about yourself!

Hi! I’m Krista. I am 22 years old and live in Northeast Ohio. I have been a nanny for four years. I currently work for an amazing family with triplet 3 year olds and a seven year old. In my free time I enjoy playing soccer, working out, or binge watching Netflix.

What led you to becoming a nanny?

My family actually steered me towards nannying. I have always been amazing with children, so when it was time to choose a future career they mentioned a nanny training school. Truthfully, I turned down the idea at first after seeing the uniforms and thinking there’s no way I can be that proper all the time. I ended up reconsidering it after a lot of research and I I am so happy I did!

Describe yourself as a nanny in 5 words.

Silly, energetic, loving, adventurous, helpful.

Describe your nannying approach. What is your childcare philosophy?

Routine! The first thing I do when I start with a family is figure out a good routine and then we stick with it. I think all children need a routine they can count on to know what to expect, but with multiples I think it is so much more important to keep them on a strict schedule.

What do you enjoy most about being a nanny?

Seeing children smile. I love seeing their cute little faces light up with self pride when they finally learn how to spell their name or do a cartwheel for the first time.

What part of nannying do you find the most challenging?

Leaving! It is so difficult to leave the children after spending so much time together and sharing so many memories with each other. I am already dreading the day when I have to leave my sweet charges.

What advice would you give to someone just beginning his or her nanny career?

Be your own advocate. Ask to have a meeting as soon as a problem arises – don’t wait for it to become a bigger issue. Communication is the key to a successful nanny/family relationship.

What is your go-to nanny outfit?

Running shorts, a t-shirt, and tennis shoes.

How do you wind down after a long day on the job?

I will either put on my headphones and go for a run at the park or just go home and relax in front of the tv.

Any childcare books, websites, or resources you recommend?

I like The Five Love Languages of Children: The Secret to Loving Children Effectively by Gary D. Chapman & Ross Campbell and Unplugged Play: No Batteries. No Plugs. Pure Fun by Bobbi Conner.

The gals behind Not Quite Mary Poppins are always looking to grow our bookshelves. What are your favorite children’s books?

Help! The Wolf is Coming! by Cadric Ramadier, Baby Bear Sees Blue by Ashley Wolff, and Go, Little Green Truck! by Roni Schotter.

Spotlight Sunday: Anita

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Tell us about yourself.

I’ve been looking after children in one way or another for almost 16 years. I started out with babysitting jobs for local families, then worked my way through univeristy at the local nursery and summer camps in the USA. After I finished uni I went on to train at Norland College. Over the past 9 years since leaving I’ve worked around the world, and loved every minute of it. I took a couple of years out of being a nanny to work for Disney Cruise Line as a performer in the Youth Activities department, which was literally a dream come true. I am a HUGE Disney fan and spend a lot of my free time doing something Disney related (if I’m not doing a ballet or tap class). For the past 3 ½ years I have been working for an amazing family in London, and hopefully will be with them for many years to come.

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[Note: Anita blogs some fantastic arts and crafts ideas over at My Baba. Check out her column here].

What led you to becoming a nanny?

Part of me has always wanted to work with children, but it was during University that some people at my church suggested that I go to Norland and train to be a Nanny. I interviewed during my 2nd year and started after I got my degree.

Describe yourself as a nanny in 5 words.

Always working to be better.

Describe your nannying approach. What is your childcare philosophy?

I have two: Every child is different.  There is no one size fits all to looking after children, even within the same family. Every child should be treated as an individual and I try to change my approach for each of them, what works for one wont necessarily work for another. My other philosophy is actually the motto for Norland – “Love Never Faileth.”

What do you enjoy most about being a nanny?

Being with my charges, I can’t wait for them to come home from school. We are always getting up to something, be it arts and crafts/ playing/ going on mini adventures.

What part of nannying do you find the most challenging?

The cooking! I’m actually a really good cook and my charges (thankfully) are great eaters. But still, I find it the most challenging, especially the cleaning up.

What advice would you give to someone just beginning his or her nannying career?

Listen to what your employers want, but don’t be afraid to stand up for things you believe in. Also, don’t let them take advantage of you. You are there to look after their children and you can’t do that if you have cleaning a house and running errands all day long.

What does a typical day at work look like for you?

Mine is slightly weird as I do 24hr care from Monday 1pm until Friday 1pm. Generally, I help get the children up at 7 and have breakfast waiting for 7:30, which the whole family have together. Then I wave the older 2 children off to school and get my youngest charge ready for the day. We spend the morning together, and over the next few months we will start to go out to play groups or museums. During his afternoon naps I start preparing dinner. By around 4pm my oldest 2 have gotten back from school and we start homework together. Then until dinner at 6 we play or do some sort of craft/activity. After that we are into the bedtime routine of bath, story and bed by 7:30. After they are in bed I will then go and clean up dinner and do the laundry.  

What is your go-to nanny outfit?

Jeans and a rugby jumper for colder weather or jeans and a t-shirt for summer.

How do you wind down after a long day on the job?

Reading, anything Disney related, cross stitching and more recently I have started to knit.

Any childcare books, websites, or resources you recommend?

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Mybaba.com is a wonderful place to find recipes, crafts and activities and advice. Also, French Children Don’t Throw Food by Pamela Druckerman and How To Crack An Egg with One Hand by Francesca Beauman.

The gals behind Not Quite Mary Poppins are always looking to grow our bookshelves. What are your favorite children’s books?

Gosh I have sooooooo many. 

The Malory Towers Series &  The Famous Five by Enid Blyton. The Worst Witch by Jill Murphy. The Owl Who Was Afraid of the Dark by Jill Thomplison. The Enormous Crocodile  George’s Marvellous Medicine by Roald Dahl. The Horrible Histories Series by Terry Deary. Goosebumps by R. L. Stein. The Grimms Complete Fairy Tales by the Grimms Brothers. Aesop’s FablesCan’t You Sleep, Little Bear? by Martin Waddell. No Matter What by Debi Gliori. My Naughty Little Sister by Dorothy Edwards. A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett.